Impermanence

Impermanence

Impermanence

DRAFT:

What the mind creates for us is not reality.  What we observe in a world based in forms is transient.

What exists is our depth of being and impermanence.

Our observable reality is a story, albeit, an amazingly consistent story.

To begin, we must understand, note that I use the word understand and not accept, that things are always changing.  This is basic enough to understand based on our experiences.  Everyone has experienced changes in their lives.  It is not something that the mind has trouble understanding.

To continue, we must accept that things are always changing.  This one is a bit more difficult for the mind to grasp.

Simple changes seem to be easily accepted, a surprise party, mild tardiness to an appointment, even a well marked detour along a familiar roads.  We tend to almost welcome changes when they appear to be positive to us.

But, once we examine more difficult changes, losing a fortune or employment, the ending of an intimate relationship, facing death, we are still staring into the abyss of impermanence, however we do not address these things the same way.  Why?

Is it because they are important?  Yes.  But, are they universally important or relatively important?

Oak and Acorns

Oak and Acorns

If you consider when a great tree that drops a seed there is merely a chance that the seed will be nurtured and grow into another great tree.  The seed is full of potential and a great tree is a wonderful thing, however if the seed is not nourished, and it never has the chance to develop, it is of no mind to the tree, the seed itself, or the rest of the world for that matter.

This tree story has been used to represent a zen master and their relationship with their students.

What becomes clear is that the experiences are a shame, but only a relative shame, because they are only of relative importance.

So, the next question to examine is, “Why is something so important to me that is not in alignment with others or the rest of the world?”

It seems that, despite the recognized imminence to change, humanity will resist change to such an extent, that one will choose to continue suffering familiar pain before adopting change.

If you have read the articles on inclusion or ego it becomes clear, that the somethings are not universally important and that they are only relatively important because of the value they bring to the ego or mind.  The ego is what seeks separation and it is what is nourished by the drama or conflict-energy that separation generates.

Duck Flapping

Duck Flapping

So the problem that humanity has with change, is in the mind, which is why nature does not experience it. Further, it becomes clear that…